And So My Love For Sylvia Plath Begins

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Hello book lovers! Today’s review is for the first classic that I have read this year and boy did I love it. I needed to read a book for my creative writing course that discussed depression in a way that current books don’t so I took a leap by selecting The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. I have been wanting to read this book for a while and went into it barely knowing anything about the plot. It did turn my stomach at times but I fell right into it and couldn’t stop reading it whenever I had the time to. I could have easily flown through it in a matter of days but darn university for making it take eleven days – which isn’t TOO bad… right?

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The Book That I Read in Only Three Days

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Hello book lovers! I am posting this review over 48 hours after finishing the book and I AM STILL NOT OKAY!! I finally gave in to buying this book on World Book Day, because I obviously had to celebrate it that way, and boy do I not know how it took me so long to pick it up! I first heard about Call Me By Your Name by Andre Aciman when the trailer was released last year as it was being shown in film festivals. It caught my attention right away with its artsy and travel vibes so once I found out that it was originally a book, I was ecstatic. Continue reading

Review: My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

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Title: My Name is Lucy Barton

Author: Elizabeth Strout

Genre: Fiction

Edition: Paperback

Award: Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2016

Goodreads Blurb: “Lucy Barton is recovering slowly from what should have been a simple operation. Her mother, to whom she hasn’t spoken for many years, comes to see her. Gentle gossip about people from Lucy’s childhood in Amgash, Illinois, seems to reconnect them, but just below the surface lies the tension and longing that have informed every aspect of Lucy’s life: her escape from her troubled family, her desire to become a writer, her marriage, her love for her two daughters.”


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Review: The Sellout by Paul Beatty

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Title: The Sellout

Author: Paul Beatty

Genre: Fiction

Edition: Paperback

Award: The Man Booker Prize 2016

Goodreads Blurb: “Paul Beatty’s The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. A biting satire about a young man’s isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, it challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father-son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality—the black Chinese restaurant. Born in the “agrarian ghetto” of Dickens—on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles—the narrator of The Sellout resigns himself to the fate of lower-middle-class Californians: “I’d die in the same bedroom I’d grown up in, looking up at the cracks in the stucco ceiling that’ve been there since ’68 quake.” Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, he spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies. He is led to believe that his father’s pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family’s financial woes, but when his father is killed in a police shoot-out, he realizes there never was a memoir. All that’s left is the bill for a drive-thru funeral. Fueled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California from further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town’s most famous resident—the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins—he initiates the most outrageous action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in the Supreme Court.”


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